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    Sikorsky requires S-92 inspections after helideck landing incident

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    Date d'inscription : 01/11/2009
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    Sikorsky requires S-92 inspections after helideck landing incident

    Message  copter le Mar 10 Jan 2017 - 17:38

    Après les H225 c'est maintenant les S92. Pas de bonnes nouvelles pour l'offshore.

    Sikorsky requires S-92 inspections after helideck landing incident
    Posted on January 10, 2017 by Elan Head
       
    Sikorsky is calling for immediate safety inspections of S-92 helicopters in the wake of a Dec. 28 incident in which an S-92 lost tail rotor authority while landing on an helideck


    In an alert service bulletin (ASB) issued on Jan. 10, Sikorsky has called for one-off inspections of the tail rotor and bearing assemblies before the next flight, and a specific check of health and usage monitoring system (HUMS) data for each aircraft, according to the offshore helicopter safety organization HeliOffshore.

    Compliance with the ASB is mandatory, which means that many S-92 helicopters will be out of service until the inspections can be completed.

    “This is a requirement to undertake a global fleet-wide inspection; it is not a grounding,” HeliOffshore emphasized on its website, although it also acknowledged that the ASB “will disrupt the offshore oil and gas industry in the short term.”

    The impact will be particularly pronounced in the North Sea, where the S-92 has seen heavy service due to the continued grounding of Airbus Helicopters H225 and AS332 L2 Super Pumas by the U.K. and Norway.

    “We anticipate that the majority of the fleet will have the initial inspection accomplished within the next 24 to 48 hours depending on their operational tempo,” a Sikorsky spokesperson told Vertical on Jan. 10. “Many operators have already informed us that they have completed this inspection. From that point, there is a recurring inspection on a continual basis.”

    The ASB estimates that the inspection will take approximately 11 hours. “However, there is variation in this time depending on each operator’s circumstances,” Sikorsky’s spokesperson noted.

    S-92 operators must perform inspections of the tail rotor and bearing assemblies before returning the aircraft to service. Heath Moffatt Photo
    S-92 operators must perform inspections of the tail rotor and bearing assemblies before returning the aircraft to service. Heath Moffatt Photo
    The ASB was prompted by an incident in which an S-92 operated by CHC Helicopter lost tail rotor authority and spun while landing on an offshore platform on Dec. 28. The aircraft was successfully landed and shut down, and there were no reported injuries among the passengers or crew, CHC stated at the time.

    With the release of the ASB, Sikorsky stated, “Safety is our top priority, and Sikorsky is working closely with our customer and investigative authorities to determine the root cause of the loss of tail rotor authority in the Dec. 28 installation landing.

    “Although the investigation into the Dec. 28 incident has not been completed, Sikorsky released an alert service bulletin on Jan. 10 to define additional interim inspection requirements for the S-92 tail rotor pitch change shaft [PCS]. Those procedures include an off-aircraft check of the PCS bearing and that check must be done before next flight with some leeway for getting back to base.

    “We are committed to keeping our customers informed. We will further communicate findings if the investigation reveals any safety or airworthiness issues that affect the S-92 helicopter fleet.”

    The Jan. 10 ASB is not the first call for inspections of the S-92’s tail rotor PCS. In November 2016, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an emergency airworthiness directive (AD) calling for inspection and/or replacement of certain tail rotor PCS assemblies. According to the FAA, the emergency AD was “prompted by a report of an operator losing [tail rotor] control while in a hover.”

    In December, the FAA followed its emergency AD with AD 2016-24-51, which exempted helicopters with a tail rotor PCS assembly manufactured or overhauled on or after Nov. 3, 2016. According to Sikorsky, due to the inspections already undertaken by the manufacturer, these aircraft are cleared to fly for up to 10 flight hours before requiring further physical inspection under the Jan. 10 ASB.

    - See more at: https://www.verticalmag.com/news/sikorsky-requires-s-92-inspections-helideck-landing-incident/#sthash.kEj2ohtu.dpuf
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    Re: Sikorsky requires S-92 inspections after helideck landing incident

    Message  copter le Sam 14 Jan 2017 - 17:58

    Pas encore une bonne nouvelle pour BABCOCK. Après les H 225, c'est maintenant les S 92.

    EXCLUSIVE: Four North Sea Helicopters Fail Tail Rotor Inspection

    The temporary grounding was mandated by manufacturer Sikorsky in an Alert Service Bulletin and comes during the investigation into a CHC S92 that spun on the helideck of the West Franklin Platform, taking gouges out of the helideck and damaging the aircrafts landing gear.

    Oil and Gas People also broke the Air Accident Investigation Branch's preliminary findings into the West Franklin Incident, which gave the following details regarding the cause of the incident: "Once the panels were removed it was immediately apparent that the tail rotor servo piston was damaged. The servo was removed and revealed that the tail rotor pitch change shaft (TRPCS) double row angular contact bearing was in a severely distressed condition"

    Oil and Gas People can now reveal that four other aircraft in the North Sea fleet have failed their inspections as follows:

    Three Babcock S92s have been affected

    One CHC S92 has been affected

    Zero Bristows S92s have been affected

    All four affected aircraft operated in the UK sector with Norwegian S92's reporting zero failed inspections.

    A spokesperson for Babcock stated: "Babcock has completed the required inspections on the whole of its S92 fleet. As a result of the inspection findings, three bearings have been returned to Sikorsky for evaluation.

    All aircraft are subject to a full testing programme ahead of their return to service."

    The revelation comes amid ongoing controversy between offshore workers as to whether the Sikorsky S92 is indeed the correct replacement for the North Seas grounded Super Puma fleet.

    A spokesperson for Sikorsky gave the following statement:

    "Physical inspections of the tail rotor pitch change shaft bearing are well underway with over 250 aircraft inspected. Sikorsky has been reviewing HUMS data from those aircraft as well. A small number of parts are being returned to Sikorsky for additional evaluation. These findings do not constitute failure of the bearing and are being returned to Sikorsky for further evaluation. Sikorsky continues to work closely with our supply chain on replacement parts and is coordinating those activities with our Customers."

    Source: http://www.oilandgaspeople.com/news/13080/exclusive-four-north-sea-helicopters-fail-tail-rotor-inspection/

      La date/heure actuelle est Lun 23 Oct 2017 - 5:55